Approved Programs

New undergraduate and graduate for-credit degree programs that have been approved by the Quality Council on or after September 1, 2011 are detailed in this database, which can be searched in multiple ways: by university, year, program level and/or keyword.

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Northern Studies, MA/MSc

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: May 20, 2016

The MA/MSc in Northern Studies is a 5-credit course-based program, whose main goal is to provide an interdisciplinary education to individuals who wish to become suitably qualified to support public- and private-sector decision making in the provincial and territorial north of Canada. In drawing upon knowledge from the natural and social sciences, the program will prepare these individuals to address the complexity of the challenges facing Canadians, particularly northern Canadians, following the resurgence of national and international interest in the Arctic: the impact of climate change on northern ecosystems and on the indigenous and non-indigenous communities that depend on ecosystem resources; changes to the Arctic Ocean that will facilitate shipping; changes to permafrost that will affect infrastructure; the stresses of cultural transition and evolving governance as land claims and self-government agreements are completed and implemented; and the need to develop functional bureaucracies and practices that reflect the aspirations of northerners. The scope of the program will not, however, be restricted to the Arctic. It will encompass also the boreal regions of the territories and provinces of Canada.

Within this context, the more specific objectives of the master’s program are: 1) to provide advanced academic training for federal and northern public servants, for northerners, and for students seeking to develop a career in the North; 2) to provide skills enabling students to access and interpret information from a variety of disciplines, to apply it in a context relevant to their profession, and to develop recommendations for their agencies and institutions based on available research; 3) to foster the development of writing and presentation skills to support enhanced and informed decision making in the North; 4) to provide foundational knowledge of biophysical and social contexts and processes in northern Canada, and of northern policy making. The program includes a substantial experiential learning component in the form of a Field Course in Canada’s North and a Practicum placement in Northern Studies.

Northern Studies, GDip (Type 2) and GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: May 9, 2016

The 3-credit graduate diploma program (GDip types 2 and 3) in Northern Studies provides an interdisciplinary education to individuals who wish to become suitably qualified to support public- and private-sector decision making in the provincial and territorial north of Canada. The graduate diploma shares the specific objectives of the MA/MSc in Northern Studies, namely: 1) to provide advanced academic training for federal and northern public servants, for northerners, and for students seeking to develop a career in the North; 2) to provide skills enabling students to access and interpret information from a variety of disciplines, to apply it in a context relevant to their profession, and to develop recommendations for their agencies and institutions based on available research; 3) to foster the development of writing and presentation skills to support enhanced and informed decision making in the North; 4) to provide foundational knowledge of biophysical and social contexts and processes in northern Canada, and of northern policy making. The diploma program shares 2.0 core credits with the MA/MSc in Northern Studies, as well as 1.0 credit in additional coursework chosen from a pre-approved list of options. The graduate diploma program does not include an experiential learning component.

Digital Media, MIT

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 24, 2016

The Master in Information Technology (MIT) with a focus on Digital Media is a research-based program comprised of 2.5 credits of coursework, including two core seminars, and a 2.5-credit thesis. The program covers three crucial areas of IT: Technology; Content; and People. The technology component of the program concentrates on developing solutions for creating, distributing, using, and interacting with digital media in targeted applications such as education, social interaction, health, art, and entertainment through the selection, creation, application, integration and administration of computing technologies. The content aspect of the program explores methods, theories, mechanisms, and styles for the design and creation of digital information and experiences directed towards the end-users. Finally, the human factor is approached through theories, practices, and studies on interaction between people and digital media (and associated technologies), and the adoption of technologies to meet their needs (and develop policies) either individually or within an organization for a given societal context.

The MIT in Digital Media offers courses and a research framework that enable students to experience and create digital media content using industry-standard pipelines. The program comprises projects and practical experiences that prepare students to evaluate various content creation technologies for proper selection in different areas of digital media such as interactive media, content management systems and advertising. Course experiences and research topics allow for the design and implementation of immersive or interactive digital media systems using appropriate hardware and software tools. The organization of the program fosters rigorous assessment of digital media technologies and products based on their feasibility and suitability for various applications.

The MIT designation indicates that this field of study is distinct from Computer Science and established areas of Engineering, and reflects the fact that Information Technology specialists today need a deeper understanding of their field than ever before. They require a different, more focused education in interactive digital media, and digital media content development pipelines.

Information Technology (Digital Media), PhD

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 24, 2016

The PhD in Information Technology with a focus on Digital Media is a research-based program comprised of 1.5 credits of coursework, including a core course at the 6000 level, one comprehensive exam, and an 8.5-credit dissertation. It extends considerably an education relevant to digital media received at the master’s level. The program covers three crucial areas of IT: Technology; Content; and People. The technology component of the program concentrates on developing solutions for creating, distributing, using, and interacting with digital media in targeted applications such as education, social interaction, health, art, and entertainment through the selection, creation, application, integration and administration of computing technologies. The content aspect of the program explores methods, theories, mechanisms, and styles for the design and creation of digital information and experience(s) directed towards the end-users. Finally, the human factor is approached through theories, practices, and studies on interaction between people and digital media (and associated technologies), and the adoption of technologies to meet their needs (and develop policies) either individually or within an organization for a given societal context.

The PhD in Digital Media offers courses and a research framework that enable students to experience and create digital media content using industry-standard pipelines. The program comprises projects and practical experiences that prepare students to evaluate various content creation technologies for proper selection in different areas of digital media such as interactive media, content management systems and advertising. Course experiences and research topics allow for the design and implementation of immersive or interactive digital media systems using appropriate hardware and software tools. The organization of the program fosters rigorous assessment of Digital Media technologies and products based on their feasibility and suitability for various applications.

Students entering the program will have a Master’s degree in one of the related three primary areas: 1) Technology (e.g., Computer Science, Engineering and Information Technology); 2) Content (e.g., Arts and Humanities); and 3) People (e.g., Psychology, Communication and Business). Admission will also require background in multidisciplinary research and Digital Media technologies.

Network Technology, MIT

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 24, 2016

The Master in Information Technology (MIT) with a focus on Network Technology is a 5-credit course-based program comprised of 3 core seminars, 2.0 credits in IT, and 1.5 credits from cognate disciplines such as Computer Science and Systems and Computer Engineering. The program delivers courses covering the design and management methods for computer networks, and discussing the composition of wireless network solutions for various applications. The MIT in Network Technology provides an educational structure that enables students to understand security issues in common computer networks and propose appropriate security solutions. Students also learn to critique and recommend different cloud-based data management systems.

The MIT in Network Technology is geared towards students who would like to gain advanced professional project-based training in practical aspects and topics related to the operation and management of networking.. Graduates of this program will help address the critical capacity gap and skills shortage that are arising across all network-centric technology domains. The MIT designation will indicate that this field of study is distinct from Computer Science and established areas of Engineering, and reflect the fact that information technology specialists now need a deeper understanding of their field than previously.

Infrastructure Protection and International Security, GDip (Type 2) and GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: December 9, 2015

Carleton University’s Graduate Diploma in Infrastructure Protection and International Security (types 2 and 3) is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. The diploma is associated with Carleton’s existing 5.0-credit Master program in Infrastructure Protection and International Security (IPIS), which is among the first in the world to bring the security, policy, and engineering components together in one coherent academic framework. The dual objective of the program is to familiarize engineers with the larger policy picture of infrastructure security in which their technical work is embedded, while giving those on the security policy side an awareness of the basic engineering principles that shape the technical boundaries of infrastructure protection policy. By having several courses in which engineers and policy experts work together on common problems and subject matter, students will learn to work collaboratively across disciplines.
The diploma (3.0 credits) will require students to take 1.5 credits of core courses and an additional 1.5 credits of elective courses. The list of approved electives is determined on the basis of the student’s background (engineering or policy). The diploma will be administered by the current IPIS Master program Committee on Infrastructure Protection and International Security (CIPIS). The membership of CIPIS is comprised of a Director, an Associate-Director, two faculty members (one from Civil Engineering and one from International Affairs) and a program administrator.

The Type 2 diploma (concurrent) will provide students in other graduate degree programs with an opportunity to supplement their core academic discipline with a new set of skills and subject knowledge related to the field of infrastructure protection.

The Type 3 diploma (direct entry) will offer practitioners an opportunity to enrich their current experience with a rigorous academic program that will enhance their ability to understand how their work fits into the wider context of infrastructure protection.

Ethics and Public Affairs, PhD

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 19, 2015

This doctoral program provides advanced training in managing questions of ethics in public life, drawing both on social science methodologies and on analytical methods of ethics and political philosophy. It builds on Carleton’s experience and strengths in interdisciplinary programming, in this case combining Philosophy (in Carleton’s Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences) with the various disciplines of Carleton’s Faculty of Public Affairs. The program’s interdisciplinary character and range distinguish it from other programs in applied ethics, which are in general taught mainly by philosophers and are discipline-specific. Most advanced applied ethics programs concentrate on a single area, such as bioethics, business ethics, global ethics, or environmental ethics. This PhD program will bring together students working on any ethics/public interface on which Carleton faculty have expertise. The program also provides training in the theory of organizational ethics and the practice of ethics officers by means of academic and practicum courses. Accordingly, the program will prepare its graduates for both academic and non-academic careers.

The 10-credit, four-year doctoral program and the associated 3.0-credit, two-year Master’s Diploma programs share a core course in the first year team-taught by one faculty member who has expertise in the social sciences and another who is expert in ethics or political philosophy. The programs then branch off from there. A parallel course, restricted to entering doctoral students, guides their first steps towards a viable research topic. The doctoral program also includes a mandatory practicum. The practicum is supported by a large network of ethics officers, practitioners, and consultants, and others who have interests and responsibilities for value-based work in government, civil society, and the private sector. In part, this network is represented by the Ethics Practitioners Association of Canada, which is headquartered in Ottawa.

The PhD program is made up as well of two comprehensive examinations and a thesis and defence component. Every doctoral student will be co-supervised by at least two faculty members who approach the student’s research topic from diverse perspectives but with complementary strengths.

Ethics and Public Affairs, GDip (Type 2)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 9, 2015

This 3-credit diploma programs will provide advanced training in managing questions of ethics in public life for students registered in another graduate program at Carleton other than the doctoral program in ethics and public affairs. The diploma draws both on social science methodologies and on analytical methods of ethics and political philosophy.

The diploma shares a common starting-point with the doctoral program in Ethics and Public Affairs. This core course will be team-taught by one faculty member who has expertise in the social sciences and another who is expert in ethics or political philosophy. Following the core course, diploma students will take an additional master’s-level course: Topics in Ethics and Public Affairs. The remaining requirement will be fulfilled by an elective course, which can include a practicum. The practicum is supported by a large network of ethics officers, practitioners, and consultants, and others who have interests and responsibilities for value-based work in government, civil society, and the private sector. In part, this network is represented by the Ethics Practitioners Association of Canada, which is headquartered in Ottawa.

 

Ethics and Public Affairs, GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 9, 2015

This 3-credit diploma programs will provide advanced training in managing questions of ethics in public life for practicing professionals. The diploma draws both on social science methodologies and on analytical methods of ethics and political philosophy.

The diploma shares a common starting-point with the doctoral program in Ethics and Public Affairs. This core course will be team-taught by one faculty member who has expertise in the social sciences and another who is expert in ethics or political philosophy. Following the core course, diploma students will take an additional master’s-level course: Topics in Ethics and Public Affairs. The remaining requirement will be fulfilled by an elective course, which can include a practicum. The practicum is supported by a large network of ethics officers, practitioners, and consultants, and others who have interests and responsibilities for value-based work in government, civil society, and the private sector. In part, this network is represented by the Ethics Practitioners Association of Canada, which is headquartered in Ottawa.

 

Masters of Accounting, MAcc

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: January 22, 2015

The Master of Accounting is a rigorous graduate program that exposes students to a breadth of professional knowledge and provides a gateway to a career as a professional accountant.  It has been designed in part to respond to the educational requirements of the Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA) and covers the skills required by the CPA Competency Map.  Students graduating from the Master of Accounting will be exempt from the CPA Canada Professional Education Program and may proceed directly to the CPA Canada Common Final Examination – the final step in becoming a chartered professional accountant.

The Master of Accounting goes beyond the CPA professional requirements by providing students with all four competencies in the accounting field: assurance, tax, finance, and performance management.  This breadth of knowledge prepares graduates to work in a variety of professional roles.  The Master of Accounting also requires students to engage in applied accounting research that is not undertaken in the CPA’s Professional Education Program.  A required internship component provides experiential learning opportunities where students apply the theoretical knowledge gained in the classroom to real-life problems.

Indigenous Policy and Administration, GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: September 30, 2014

This graduate diploma program provides the opportunity for professionals working in Indigenous organizations and government agencies in Ontario and Canada as well as other interested individuals to obtain a relevant education in Indigenous Policy and Administration. Students enrolling in this diploma will not be registered in another graduate program at Carleton. With courses at the graduate level, this diploma is shorter than the MA in Public Administration program, which has a concentration in Indigenous Policy and Administration similar in content.

The diploma will serve current and future leaders of Indigenous governments and organizations, as well as the governments and public, private and non-profit organizations that work with them. Its goal is to provide students with the knowledge, skills and cultural competencies for meeting the challenges of governance, policy development and its implementation. The ultimate aim is to enhance the effectiveness of First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) governments and organizations, and non-FNMI governments and organizations that work with them, and improve relationships between FNMI and non-FNMI governments and industries in ways that are culturally appropriate and sustainable.

The initiative to introduce this diploma is the result of a successful bid by Carleton’s School of Public Policy and Administration in a competition established by Ontario’s Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities to provide funding for the development and implementation of master’s-level education in this area.

Indigenous Policy and Administration, GDip (Type 2)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: September 18, 2014

This graduate diploma program provides the opportunity for students already enrolled in a master’s or doctoral program other than the MA in Public Administration to complement their primary program with a relevant education in Indigenous Policy and Administration. With courses at the graduate level, this diploma is shorter than the MA in Public Administration program, which has a concentration in Indigenous Policy and Administration similar in content.

The diploma will serve current and future leaders of Indigenous governments and organizations, as well as the governments and public, private and non-profit organizations that work with them. Its goal is to provide students with the knowledge, skills and cultural competencies for meeting the challenges of governance, policy development and its implementation. The ultimate aim is to enhance the effectiveness of First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) governments and organizations, and non-FNMI governments and organizations that work with them, and improve relationships between FNMI and non-FNMI governments and industries in ways that are culturally appropriate and sustainable.

The initiative to introduce this diploma is the result of a successful bid by Carleton’s School of Public Policy and Administration in a competition established by Ontario’s Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities to provide funding for the development and implementation of master’s-level education in this area.

Data Science, Master's Level (Collaborative Program)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 28, 2014

The academic objective of the collaborative master’s in Data Science is to provide training in the analysis of Big Data in a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary setting, and thereby to provide the skills necessary to undertake a piece of original research. Data Science, or Big Data, is a rapidly growing field without clear boundaries. Although many of the technical foundations arise from Mathematics and Computer Science, data science is often performed in collaborations spanning many disciplines to bring together the needed proficiencies and expertise. As such, the area is fundamentally both multi- and interdisciplinary. Industry has identified Big Data as a main thrust for growth in future business.

The Data Science collaborative master’s is thus multidisciplinary. It will include students and faculty from a variety of disciplines. More importantly, however, the new program will be at its core interdisciplinary and collaborative in that data science research involves new scholarly tools and databases which greatly facilitate dialogue, collaboration and translation between traditionally defined disciplines. The collaborative master’s is also interdisciplinary in that students from different disciplines can learn from each other in developing the same substantive core of understanding and expertise.

Digital Humanities, Master's Level (Collaborative Program)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 15, 2013

The Collaborative Master’s with a specialization in Digital Humanities is especially designed for master’s students in participating programs in the Faculties of Arts and Social Science who wish to enrich their training in a particular discipline or area of study by developing expertise in Digital Humanities. The general academic objective of this program is to provide training in critical theories and methodologies in humanities scholarship enabled by new digital media, texts and tools, and thereby to provide the skills necessary to undertake a piece of original research.

The Digital Humanities program will be multidisciplinary in that it will include students and faculty from a variety of disciplines. This new program will be at its core collaborative in that Digital Humanities research involves new scholarly tools and databases, which greatly facilitate dialogue, collaboration and translation between traditionally defined disciplines. The program is also interdisciplinary in what students from different disciplines can learn from each other in developing the same substantive core of understanding and expertise. It will offer students the opportunity to engage in genuinely interdisciplinary research with other students and faculty from across the Faculty.

Health: Science, Technology and Policy, MSc (HSTP)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 27, 2012

This interdisciplinary program aims to provide students with the skills and training required to work at the interface between research and policy in the health sector. The emphasis on skill acquisition and a problem-based approach, in combination with the collaborative character of the research component, are central features of the master’s program that aims to train students to work effectively in cross-disciplinary teams.

Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership, MPNL

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 27, 2012

The Master of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership program provides a rigorous preparation for making substantive professional contributions within or through philanthropic and nonprofit organizations, or the public and private organizations that engage with them. The core courses provide an understanding of the roles and ethics of philanthropy, policy processes and regulatory contexts, the procedures and strategies for governance, financing and accountability, and the concepts fundamental to evaluation and research. The elective courses provide a focus either on the raising or effective disbursement of funds or on the organizational development and social impact of the sector.

African Studies, Master's Level (Collaborative Program)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 16, 2012

The Collaborative Master’s with a specialization in African Studies is especially designed for master’s students in participating programs in the Faculties of Arts and Social Science, Public Affairs and the Sprott School of Business who wish to enrich their training in a particular discipline or area of study by developing expertise in African Studies through interdisciplinary dialogue.

Health: Science, Technology and Policy, GDip (Type 2)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 16, 2012

This program provides the opportunity for students already enrolled in a master’s program to complement their primary program with relevant health courses. The core requirements for the type 2 diploma are designed to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of research methods and policy, with an emphasis on health, as well as with career-related skills through the knowledge translation course.

Health: Science, Technology and Policy, GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 16, 2012

This type 3 diploma is intended for individuals who already have careers in a health-related field. Students will be provided with training in knowledge translation and courses which focus on areas of specific relevance to the health sector: Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Health Policy and Administration, Social and Behavioural Determinants of Health, Environmental Health, Science of Disease, Engineering, Design and Computer Science in Health.

Health: Science, Technology and Policy, GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 16, 2012

This type 3 diploma is intended for individuals who already have careers in a health-related field. Students will be provided with training in knowledge translation and courses which focus on areas of specific relevance to the health sector: Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Health Policy and Administration, Social and Behavioural Determinants of Health, Environmental Health, Science of Disease, Engineering, Design and Computer Science in Health.

Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership, GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: July 16, 2012

This graduate diploma program is shorter than the Master of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership (MPNL) and is aimed at those who already have advanced degrees and experience in the sector. However, like the MPNL, this diploma program provides preparation for making substantive professional contributions within or through philanthropic and nonprofit organizations, or the public and private organizations that engage with them.

Interdisciplinary Science and Practice, BSc

Undergraduate Carleton University
Decision Date: May 10, 2018

The B.Sc in Interdisciplinary Science and Practice integrates concepts and knowledge from different science disciplines to be applied to real world problems through local and global perspectives. This program innovates the conventional science curriculum to entrench the principles and practice of interdisciplinarity, and includes a 15-credit degree and 20-credit Honours degree.  Students are asked to complete 8 interdisciplinary science courses and one minor within the Faculty of Science.  Honours students are also encouraged to complete a second minor within the Faculty with learning culminating in an academic capstone experience (group research project; research essay or individual research project). Program graduates will be well prepared to balance specialized technical knowledge with the transferable skills of critical thinking and problem solving, teamwork, and science communication.

The program was developed entirely around the notion of providing students with a unique learning experience. From the first year where students will participate in seminar courses which in part will orient them to university life and to their group research proposal on community or citizen science projects, students will feel engaged with their peers and connected to the community beyond the classroom. Students will be exposed to a broad base of scientific fundamentals and also learn about science communication, data and knowledge synthesis, and collaboration with diverse partners.

The program has adopted a learner-centered, experiential pedagogy to reach across disciplines and into the community.  The program will build on collaborations with Indigenous groups to introduce students to different “ways of knowing”. The program will also utilize “citizen science” and “peer-to-peer science” models as innovative means to demystify science through effective communication, to build bridges between our students and the community, and to engage students and community in forging new models of critical analysis. Throughout each course, students will navigate the theory and practice of interdisciplinarity to strengthen their capacity for collaboration, critical inquiry, and science communication. To showcase this, all students in their third year, will contribute to the proposal of an interdisciplinary project. Honours students will be asked to develop capstone projects to reflect their interests from an interdisciplinary perspective, as well as involve them in an aspect of academic-community engagement.

Media Production and Design, BMPD

Undergraduate Carleton University
Decision Date: April 20, 2017

Carleton University’s Bachelor of Media Production and Design (BMPD) responds to the opportunities for new forms of storytelling flowing from the convergence of media, information, public engagement and design. This convergence has resulted in a growing demand for individuals who can combine the non-fiction storytelling and explanatory skills of journalists with design and online production capabilities, turning ideas into informative and engaging online content.

The BMPD, which is the first of its kind in Canada, is housed in Carleton’s School of Journalism and Communication (SJC). It draws on three sources: new courses created for the BMPD program; some existing courses offered by the SJC; and some existing courses tailored for the needs of BMPD students that are taught in Carleton’s School of Information Technology (SIT). A combination of intensive hands-on workshops and lecture courses will give students a strong foundation in data, research, writing, and narrative abilities across media formats (text, photography, audio, video and graphics) as well as design and production skills.

The 20-credit degree includes 12.0 prescribed core credits, with an optional one-year co-op placement commencing in the January after the fall term of the program’s third year. The emphasis throughout the program is on experiential learning in workshops that creatively combine narrative, public engagement and design into distinctive online storytelling. The classroom experience will foster fundamental production and design skills and thinking in the development and application of narratives, with the understanding that design influences information pathways, making “story” and “design” inseparable. The BMPD will thus prepare students to innovate and operate across all facets of narrative that engage, inform, entertain and ultimately contribute to a broader and deeper understanding of how we connect with each other in the 21st century to build stronger societies.

Indigenous Studies, BA (Combined Honours)

Undergraduate Carleton University
Decision Date: December 18, 2015

The Combined B.A. Honour’s in Indigenous Studies, which builds on Carleton’s existing strengths in this area, will engage students with aspects of Indigenous peoples’ ways of knowing and living in the world that include, among other things, ecological epistemologies, histories, cultural practices and traditions, languages, diplomacies, politics, and community dynamics. It will expose both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students to the historical and contemporary experience of Indigenous peoples in North America and globally. It will also train students in cross-cultural communication with an aim towards building bridges between communities and will embody principles of Indigenous pedagogy. The program will be innovative in that it will include a practicum and community-engagement capstone course animated by the Mamiwininmowin (Algonquin language) concept of aditawazi nisoditadiwin, or walking in two worlds. It will also set itself apart from Indigenous Studies programs in other Ontario universities insofar as it will be thoroughly interdisciplinary, encompassing a wide range of courses designed specifically for Indigenous Studies. The program will also have the distinctive advantage of being located in the nation’s capital.

The program will be structured around four main thematic areas or suites of courses centered on: 1) Indigenous Peoplehood Studies; 2) Indigenous ways of knowing and epistemologies; 3) The history of Indigenous-Settler relations and colonization; and 4) Indigenous recovery, vitalization, and reclamation and decolonization. It will be comprised of a total of 20.0 credits, 7.0 of which will be in Indigenous Studies, including 4.5 core credits distributed over the four years of the program and 2.5 credits of elective courses. It will culminate in a fourth-year capstone course entitled “Indigeneity and the City.” The program will be housed in the School of Canadian Studies. It will have a Program Coordinator and a Committee of Management that will include Elders, faculty members, community members, administrative professionals and students from across the university. Day-to-day administration will be conducted by the School’s regular staff. It is important for staff members to be versed in the specific needs of Indigenous students. Therefore, the School will develop a specialized training program to ensure staff can assist Indigenous students in ways that are culturally appropriate.

Information Resource Management, BIT (Bachelor of Information Technology)

Undergraduate Carleton University
Decision Date: April 23, 2015

The Bachelor of Information Technology – Information Resource Management (BIT-IRM) is a fully integrated joint program offered collaboratively by Carleton University and Algonquin College. Students attend both Carleton and Algonquin on a weekly basis in each of the program’s four years, experiencing theory at Carleton and reinforcing the theory with practical skills provided at Algonquin.  At Carleton, students benefit from the expertise of highly trained faculty engaged in advanced research projects, and modern facilities including a dedicated computer lab for IRM students in a new building and dedicated group study rooms in MacOdrum Library’s new Discovery Centre. Students also have the opportunity to work on practicums and senior research projects with professional librarians and paraprofessional staff at the Library.

The IRM program provides a carefully designed multidisciplinary curriculum which covers both mainstream library science/information management and information technology in order to develop a skillset in demand by employers. Library science and information management are covered by courses in cataloguing and metadata, collections management, subject analysis and indexing, and reference services.  The program also offers substantial coverage of information technology to reflect the requirements of the modern information economy, including courses in web interface development, programming, database theory and development and network technology. In addition, students take courses delivered by Carleton departments outside the School of Information Technology, including courses in statistics taught by faculty from the School of Mathematics and Statistics, communication skills taught by faculty from the School of Linguistics and Language Studies and business courses taught by faculty in the Sprott School of Business.  Finally, the program includes a four-credit Minor requirement intended to provide a subject-area specialty for graduates of the BIT-IRM program.

The BIT-IRM is a unique program in Canada that fills a need in the education and labour markets. There are four library technician programs in Ontario and 17 across Canada. None offers the opportunity for a combined degree and diploma in four years; none emphasizes the management of digital information resources including research data; and none offers the extensive practicum and experiential learning opportunities that are a feature of this program. University programs in the related fields of librarianship and information management occur only at the graduate level. Consultations with major government and other employers in the National Capital Region indicate strong support for this program as well as the potential for co-op and practicum placements.

The BIT-IRM program builds on the success of three other joint BIT programs currently offered collaboratively by Carleton and Algonquin: Interactive Multimedia and Design; Network Technology; and Photonics and Laser Technology. Graduates from the program will be awarded a Bachelor of Information Technology degree from Carleton and the Library and Information Technician (LIT) diploma from Algonquin. Graduates will thus obtain in four years two credentials that would otherwise take six years. In the four years that students engage in the program, they are considered students of both institutions and enjoy full rights on both campuses.

Global and International Studies, B.G.In.S. - (15 credit and 20 credit)

Undergraduate Carleton University
Decision Date: August 7, 2014

The Bachelor of Global and International Studies is jointly offered by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and the Faculty of Public Affairs.  It is intended for students who want to learn more about, and engage constructively with, the world in which we live.  It is expected that it will allow students to pursue a wide range of career options related to global and international studies, including graduate school in a number of different disciplinary areas.  It is both multidisciplinary, in that it introduces students to the many different disciplinary perspectives on global and international studies, and interdisciplinary, in that it places these disciplinary perspectives in critical dialogue with each other.

There are four components to the degree: 1) a multidisciplinary core course sequence which provides all students with a common foundation in global and international studies; 2) 12 specializations, some defined thematically and some defined in terms of geographic regions of the world, which allow students to acquire a more in-depth knowledge of a subject of particular interest to them; 3) a language requirement intended to make students capable of engaging with another culture in a second language and 4) an overseas experience requirement to ensure that all students have practical experience of living and studying abroad.   External admission is only to the 4 year (20 credit) Honours degree, though students in program may transfer to the 3 year (15 credit) General degree.

Health Science, BHSc

Undergraduate Carleton University
Decision Date: June 28, 2013

The Bachelor of Health Sciences program is designed to prepare students for employment as well as for the advanced graduate or professional training required for a diverse array of health careers. This BHSc program features several novel attributes. Through these attributes it develops a distinctive range of expertise and skills in students to equip them to adapt effectively to the rapidly changing and increasingly multi-disciplinary and collaborative nature of health delivery and research. The program offers an interdisciplinary look at health that draws on social, geographical, economic, psychological, technological and other factors.