Approved Programs

New undergraduate and graduate for-credit degree programs that have been approved by the Quality Council on or after September 1, 2011 are detailed in this database, which can be searched in multiple ways: by university, year, program level and/or keyword.

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Health Sciences, MSc/PhD

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 1, 2017

The Master of Science (5 credits) and PhD (10 credits) in Health Sciences build upon the current BSc in Health Sciences and Master of Science in Health: Science, Technology and Policy offered by the Department of Health Sciences to provide graduate students with greater theoretical knowledge and research expertise in the area of health sciences.

These new interdisciplinary research-intensive programs, which will be housed in Carleton’s new Health Sciences building, allow graduates to acquire the skills and proficiencies necessary to excel in health careers including health research and education, across public, private and non- governmental health sectors. To encourage interdisciplinarity and enhance the student’s sense of belonging to a community of health scientists, there is a common core course (0.5 credit) that will be required for all enrolled graduate students. This course will bring students together to foster knowledge translation across health disciplines and between students with different backgrounds, to discuss topical and complex health problems, advances, and solutions. In addition to this common course, MSc students will complete one more core course (0.5 credit) and a thesis (4.0 credits), and PhD candidates will complete two other core courses (1.0 credit) and a dissertation (8.5 credits). Students may also enroll in the Data Science specialization, a collaborative specialization currently offered at the Master’s level.

Despite the great demand for health sciences education at the graduate level, and the growing need for such programs to position graduates for success in the rapidly changing job market and in subsequent professional programs, few stand-alone graduate programs in health sciences exist, and fewer still are interdisciplinary as are Carleton’s new programs. Carleton’s programs are also distinct from those currently offered at other universities, because of the relationships the Department of Health Sciences has with local, national, and international organizations. Through these partnerships and collaborations, students will be exposed to and engage in internationally recognized, high-impact research.

Biomedical Engineering, PhD (Joint with the University of Ottawa)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: January 27, 2017

The Joint PhD in Biomedical Engineering builds upon and complements the existing Master of Applied Science/Master of Engineering program offered by the Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Biomedical Engineering (OCIBME), which was established in 2006. The Institute draws on the expertise of two participating medical research units: the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI) and the University of Ottawa Eye Institute. It also draws on the expertise of a number of prominent researchers from other associated academic units and research institutes at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. The OCIBME also has close ties with local Ottawa hospitals, which provides unique opportunities for students.

As with the existing MASc/MEng program in Biomedical Engineering, the joint PhD is a multidisciplinary degree, welcoming applicants from a wide variety of academic fields, including engineering, computer science, biomedical sciences, and health sciences. It responds to increasing demand from students in these fields for highly specialized and innovative education in the area of biomedical engineering. The program consists of three courses and a thesis, with two of the courses in the area of biomedical engineering, and the third from any discipline related to the needs of the student’s research area. This elective course serves to cultivate the multidisciplinary character of biomedical engineering. As with other joint programs, students in this PhD program may choose elective graduate courses from either university.

The program provides several new and unique research dimensions in the field of biomedical engineering relative to other biomedical programs in Canada. It has the unique advantage of being offered jointly by a number of academic units from two major universities. Each of these units have distinguished research strengths and recognized contributions in a number of biomedical research fields. The sharing of research/laboratory facilities and major research collections between the two institutions also provides students with an outstanding spectrum of research resources.

 

Curatorial Studies, GDip (Type 2) and GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: January 16, 2017

Carleton University’s Graduate Diploma in Curatorial Studies (Type 2 and Type 3) is unique in Canada in providing flexible, multidisciplinary professional training in curatorial practice and theory. It responds to the high demand for curatorial skills, which are essential in an extraordinarily wide range of contexts. Individuals with curatorial expertise are urgently required for work in a large number of North American cultural industries caught up in cycles of institutional expansion, renewal, and retirements. The demand is also being fueled by the global expansion of artistic and historic exhibition spaces especially evident in China, and massive digitization projects rendering collections, like those of India’s cultural institutions, visible to world audiences for the first time. To address this broad diversity of interests and applications, the Diploma combines practical modules, subject-specific training and broad academic education that will foster student success in the job market.

The Diploma is a 3.0 credit program comprised of two 0.5 credit pro-seminar courses in curatorial studies, one covering general theoretical and methodological issues, the other providing discipline-specific instruction in curatorial practices. Students take an additional credit in a cognate discipline (which, for the Type 2, may be fulfilled by courses from the student’s core discipline), and a 1.0 credit practicum in cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, galleries etc. Carleton’s location in the national capital provides access to cultural resources unparalleled elsewhere in Canada. These rich resources greatly contribute to and enhance the student-learning environment.

The Type 2 option is of interest primarily to students pursuing graduate degrees in Anthropology, Architecture, Art History, Canadian Studies, Cultural Mediations, Child Studies, Digital Humanities, Earth Sciences, Film Studies, Geography, History, Indigenous Studies, Communications Studies, Music, Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies, etc. The Type 3 option is of interest to professionals working in Canadian cultural institutions and international students seeking to upgrade their curatorial qualifications and learn North American best practices.

Northern Studies, MA/MSc

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: May 20, 2016

The MA/MSc in Northern Studies is a 5-credit course-based program, whose main goal is to provide an interdisciplinary education to individuals who wish to become suitably qualified to support public- and private-sector decision making in the provincial and territorial north of Canada. In drawing upon knowledge from the natural and social sciences, the program will prepare these individuals to address the complexity of the challenges facing Canadians, particularly northern Canadians, following the resurgence of national and international interest in the Arctic: the impact of climate change on northern ecosystems and on the indigenous and non-indigenous communities that depend on ecosystem resources; changes to the Arctic Ocean that will facilitate shipping; changes to permafrost that will affect infrastructure; the stresses of cultural transition and evolving governance as land claims and self-government agreements are completed and implemented; and the need to develop functional bureaucracies and practices that reflect the aspirations of northerners. The scope of the program will not, however, be restricted to the Arctic. It will encompass also the boreal regions of the territories and provinces of Canada.

Within this context, the more specific objectives of the master’s program are: 1) to provide advanced academic training for federal and northern public servants, for northerners, and for students seeking to develop a career in the North; 2) to provide skills enabling students to access and interpret information from a variety of disciplines, to apply it in a context relevant to their profession, and to develop recommendations for their agencies and institutions based on available research; 3) to foster the development of writing and presentation skills to support enhanced and informed decision making in the North; 4) to provide foundational knowledge of biophysical and social contexts and processes in northern Canada, and of northern policy making. The program includes a substantial experiential learning component in the form of a Field Course in Canada’s North and a Practicum placement in Northern Studies.

Northern Studies, GDip (Type 2) and GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: May 9, 2016

The 3-credit graduate diploma program (GDip types 2 and 3) in Northern Studies provides an interdisciplinary education to individuals who wish to become suitably qualified to support public- and private-sector decision making in the provincial and territorial north of Canada. The graduate diploma shares the specific objectives of the MA/MSc in Northern Studies, namely: 1) to provide advanced academic training for federal and northern public servants, for northerners, and for students seeking to develop a career in the North; 2) to provide skills enabling students to access and interpret information from a variety of disciplines, to apply it in a context relevant to their profession, and to develop recommendations for their agencies and institutions based on available research; 3) to foster the development of writing and presentation skills to support enhanced and informed decision making in the North; 4) to provide foundational knowledge of biophysical and social contexts and processes in northern Canada, and of northern policy making. The diploma program shares 2.0 core credits with the MA/MSc in Northern Studies, as well as 1.0 credit in additional coursework chosen from a pre-approved list of options. The graduate diploma program does not include an experiential learning component.

Digital Media, MIT

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 24, 2016

The Master in Information Technology (MIT) with a focus on Digital Media is a research-based program comprised of 2.5 credits of coursework, including two core seminars, and a 2.5-credit thesis. The program covers three crucial areas of IT: Technology; Content; and People. The technology component of the program concentrates on developing solutions for creating, distributing, using, and interacting with digital media in targeted applications such as education, social interaction, health, art, and entertainment through the selection, creation, application, integration and administration of computing technologies. The content aspect of the program explores methods, theories, mechanisms, and styles for the design and creation of digital information and experiences directed towards the end-users. Finally, the human factor is approached through theories, practices, and studies on interaction between people and digital media (and associated technologies), and the adoption of technologies to meet their needs (and develop policies) either individually or within an organization for a given societal context.

The MIT in Digital Media offers courses and a research framework that enable students to experience and create digital media content using industry-standard pipelines. The program comprises projects and practical experiences that prepare students to evaluate various content creation technologies for proper selection in different areas of digital media such as interactive media, content management systems and advertising. Course experiences and research topics allow for the design and implementation of immersive or interactive digital media systems using appropriate hardware and software tools. The organization of the program fosters rigorous assessment of digital media technologies and products based on their feasibility and suitability for various applications.

The MIT designation indicates that this field of study is distinct from Computer Science and established areas of Engineering, and reflects the fact that Information Technology specialists today need a deeper understanding of their field than ever before. They require a different, more focused education in interactive digital media, and digital media content development pipelines.

Information Technology (Digital Media), PhD

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 24, 2016

The PhD in Information Technology with a focus on Digital Media is a research-based program comprised of 1.5 credits of coursework, including a core course at the 6000 level, one comprehensive exam, and an 8.5-credit dissertation. It extends considerably an education relevant to digital media received at the master’s level. The program covers three crucial areas of IT: Technology; Content; and People. The technology component of the program concentrates on developing solutions for creating, distributing, using, and interacting with digital media in targeted applications such as education, social interaction, health, art, and entertainment through the selection, creation, application, integration and administration of computing technologies. The content aspect of the program explores methods, theories, mechanisms, and styles for the design and creation of digital information and experience(s) directed towards the end-users. Finally, the human factor is approached through theories, practices, and studies on interaction between people and digital media (and associated technologies), and the adoption of technologies to meet their needs (and develop policies) either individually or within an organization for a given societal context.

The PhD in Digital Media offers courses and a research framework that enable students to experience and create digital media content using industry-standard pipelines. The program comprises projects and practical experiences that prepare students to evaluate various content creation technologies for proper selection in different areas of digital media such as interactive media, content management systems and advertising. Course experiences and research topics allow for the design and implementation of immersive or interactive digital media systems using appropriate hardware and software tools. The organization of the program fosters rigorous assessment of Digital Media technologies and products based on their feasibility and suitability for various applications.

Students entering the program will have a Master’s degree in one of the related three primary areas: 1) Technology (e.g., Computer Science, Engineering and Information Technology); 2) Content (e.g., Arts and Humanities); and 3) People (e.g., Psychology, Communication and Business). Admission will also require background in multidisciplinary research and Digital Media technologies.

Network Technology, MIT

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 24, 2016

The Master in Information Technology (MIT) with a focus on Network Technology is a 5-credit course-based program comprised of 3 core seminars, 2.0 credits in IT, and 1.5 credits from cognate disciplines such as Computer Science and Systems and Computer Engineering. The program delivers courses covering the design and management methods for computer networks, and discussing the composition of wireless network solutions for various applications. The MIT in Network Technology provides an educational structure that enables students to understand security issues in common computer networks and propose appropriate security solutions. Students also learn to critique and recommend different cloud-based data management systems.

The MIT in Network Technology is geared towards students who would like to gain advanced professional project-based training in practical aspects and topics related to the operation and management of networking.. Graduates of this program will help address the critical capacity gap and skills shortage that are arising across all network-centric technology domains. The MIT designation will indicate that this field of study is distinct from Computer Science and established areas of Engineering, and reflect the fact that information technology specialists now need a deeper understanding of their field than previously.

Infrastructure Protection and International Security, GDip (Type 2) and GDip (Type 3)

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: December 9, 2015

Carleton University’s Graduate Diploma in Infrastructure Protection and International Security (types 2 and 3) is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. The diploma is associated with Carleton’s existing 5.0-credit Master program in Infrastructure Protection and International Security (IPIS), which is among the first in the world to bring the security, policy, and engineering components together in one coherent academic framework. The dual objective of the program is to familiarize engineers with the larger policy picture of infrastructure security in which their technical work is embedded, while giving those on the security policy side an awareness of the basic engineering principles that shape the technical boundaries of infrastructure protection policy. By having several courses in which engineers and policy experts work together on common problems and subject matter, students will learn to work collaboratively across disciplines.
The diploma (3.0 credits) will require students to take 1.5 credits of core courses and an additional 1.5 credits of elective courses. The list of approved electives is determined on the basis of the student’s background (engineering or policy). The diploma will be administered by the current IPIS Master program Committee on Infrastructure Protection and International Security (CIPIS). The membership of CIPIS is comprised of a Director, an Associate-Director, two faculty members (one from Civil Engineering and one from International Affairs) and a program administrator.

The Type 2 diploma (concurrent) will provide students in other graduate degree programs with an opportunity to supplement their core academic discipline with a new set of skills and subject knowledge related to the field of infrastructure protection.

The Type 3 diploma (direct entry) will offer practitioners an opportunity to enrich their current experience with a rigorous academic program that will enhance their ability to understand how their work fits into the wider context of infrastructure protection.

Ethics and Public Affairs, PhD

Graduate Carleton University
Decision Date: March 19, 2015

This doctoral program provides advanced training in managing questions of ethics in public life, drawing both on social science methodologies and on analytical methods of ethics and political philosophy. It builds on Carleton’s experience and strengths in interdisciplinary programming, in this case combining Philosophy (in Carleton’s Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences) with the various disciplines of Carleton’s Faculty of Public Affairs. The program’s interdisciplinary character and range distinguish it from other programs in applied ethics, which are in general taught mainly by philosophers and are discipline-specific. Most advanced applied ethics programs concentrate on a single area, such as bioethics, business ethics, global ethics, or environmental ethics. This PhD program will bring together students working on any ethics/public interface on which Carleton faculty have expertise. The program also provides training in the theory of organizational ethics and the practice of ethics officers by means of academic and practicum courses. Accordingly, the program will prepare its graduates for both academic and non-academic careers.

The 10-credit, four-year doctoral program and the associated 3.0-credit, two-year Master’s Diploma programs share a core course in the first year team-taught by one faculty member who has expertise in the social sciences and another who is expert in ethics or political philosophy. The programs then branch off from there. A parallel course, restricted to entering doctoral students, guides their first steps towards a viable research topic. The doctoral program also includes a mandatory practicum. The practicum is supported by a large network of ethics officers, practitioners, and consultants, and others who have interests and responsibilities for value-based work in government, civil society, and the private sector. In part, this network is represented by the Ethics Practitioners Association of Canada, which is headquartered in Ottawa.

The PhD program is made up as well of two comprehensive examinations and a thesis and defence component. Every doctoral student will be co-supervised by at least two faculty members who approach the student’s research topic from diverse perspectives but with complementary strengths.